NOW THERE IS NOTHING NOT RUN BY, REFERRING TO, OR BOUND BY SYSTEMICITY, IT OPERATES AS AT ONCE ALL-INCLUSIVE AND WIERDLY OBSOLESCENT AS AN IDEOLOGICAL STRUCTURE.
Much work of the 1960s and 1970s may be understood as addressing not only the tautoligical systems of administration but, often under the radar, those of subjectivity and identity as well.
The solipsist, by definition, cannot appropriate systems culled from outside him or herself. And yet, ironically, by so diligently honing methods to resist exteriority, the solipsist ultimately reveals the delicate connection between self and social.
Establishing one or several systems to keep the outside at bay, the solipsist cultivates a kind of shield, one predicated on mental manouvers of perceptual ordering and reordering

the purposelessness of purpose, to the spinning gears of a machine disconnected from reason

false problems, ‘that manifest fully in the brilliance of routine’

skill, material, method

mechanisms for a kind of self preservation

a unique perceptual breakdown of conceptual order, into visual chaos
while touted as founded on rigid logic and little else, LeWitts structures are inherently haywire, imploding in on their obsessively rendered frameworks
About Serial Art, Systems, Solipsism by Mel Bochner

'posits the artist who uses serial methods as someone making work that is not merely self centred but out-and-out solipsistic'

'Usually dealt as a slanderous jab, Bochner utilises the term affectionately, dubbing solipsistic serealists only those artists for whom he holds the highest respect'

Bochner admits that ‘no stylistic or material qualities unite the artists using this approach because what form the work takes is unimportant’

Husserlian Phenomonology
'both enforces the supposed boundaries between work, maker and observer, and makes clear the impossibility of seperating them'

Open Systems. (70/71).

Early in life, we are told: You are not the centre of the universe. This statement, however, speaks to one of the fundamental problems of our wordly experience, since, to all intents and purposes, we cannot help byt percieve things as if we are
suggests that the potency of tautology lies in its equal ability to critique institutions and support them.